February 17, 2009 (InfoPowa News) — The eleventh outing for the Full Tilt Online Poker Series ended
on a high note this week with the conclusion of two big money events
that generated high entries and big prize money, and a new record for
tourney entries.
 
The $500+$35 NL Hold’em Main Event presented
players with a $2.5 million guaranteed prize pool and the players
responded with a 5,287 entry turnout, boosting the pool to a remarkable
$2,643,500 and the first prize to a bank account boosting $456,056 and
change.  
 
The competition was tough, with names such as Steve
Billirakis, James “Mig_com” Mackey and Chris “Genius28″ Lee in the
field, setting a punishing pace for the 13 hours of play which finally
produced a final table.
 
The eventual winner, Adam “csimmsux” Geyer,
began the final table second in chips and managed to deploy skill,
talent and good cards to maintain and strengthen his position to the
end. He was faced in the heads up by KA1SERfknSOZE, whose second placing earned a useful $276,245.
 
Besides
his first place take home cash of $456,056, Geyer added another
significant line to his c.v., which includes wins in the FTOPS VII
Two-Day Event in February 2008, where he picked up $488,175; a win in
Event 13 of the FTOPS V in 2007, and a 14th-place finish in the FTOPS V
main event.
 
Entry records fell in Event 24 of the
tournament, too. This $750,000 guaranteed No-Limit Hold’em Knockout
event hosted by Andy Black attracted a record 9,061 entries, taking the
prize pool to $906,100, which gave winner girlyhurly a first place payday of $144,885.39.
 
The biggest winner’s purse in FTOPS XI went to player fyrtuk who earned $625,000 as winner of Event #22,
a $5,000+200 NL Hold’em 6-max contest over two days hosted by Allen
Cunningham. This “high roller” event carried a guaranteed prize pool of
$2 million and attracted 500 players, many of them top personalities in
online poker.
 
The heads up was between fyrtuk and Adam “Roothlus” Levy,
who gave a great and talented performance but was not able to overcome
an almost 5-to-1 chip count deficiency going into the heads up and had
to be content with a second place check for $387,500.